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ARM Institute opens Florida office

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The ARM Institute is a Robotics and AI Manufacturing Innovation Institute. | Source: ARM Institute The Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM) Institute announced that it opened an office in St. Petersburg, Florida. The new office will be located near the Tampa Bay Innovation Center.  “Florida was the logical choice for the ARM Institute’s second location”, Suzy Teele, ARM Institute Chief Strategy Officer, said. “There are over 13,000 manufacturing organizations in critical industry sectors such as aerospace, electronics, defense, apparel, and food production that can greatly benefit from advanced automation. Florida is also widely recognized as a fast-growing state for technology and innovation. These facts, along with our active Florida-based projects with member organizations such as Johnson and Johnson, Lockheed Martin, and AmSkills, among others, convinced us that we could further our regional support and execute our mission on a significant level by opening an office in thi

Inside Waymo’s safety benchmarks for robotaxis

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A conceptual illustration of the collision avoidance performance of the Waymo Driver. | Source: Waymo While autonomous vehicles are being deployed in cities across the U.S., like Austin, Las Vegas, Miami, Phoenix and San Francisco, members of the public still have many questions about how safe the vehicles are and they compare to human drivers. Currently, there aren’t any universally accepted approaches for evaluating the safety of autonomous driving systems, so Waymo , the self-driving unit of Google’s parent company Alphabet, released its Response Time paper and Collision Avoidance Benchmarking paper to provide more clarity on the safety benchmarks it holds for its vehicles. The papers outline how the Waymo Driver compares to average human drivers and better than average drivers. To compare human drivers to the Waymo Driver, the company first needed to determine how well human drivers are able to avoid collisions. Typically, human response timing has been evaluated during cont

Top 10 robotics stories of September 2022

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Big acquisitions, bipedal robots and an FTC investigation captured your attention in September.  Here are the 10 most popular robotics stories on The Robot Report in September. Subscribe to The Robot Report Newsletter to stay updated on the robotics stories you need to know about. 10. Sensor breakdown: how robot vacuums navigate Over the past few years, robot vacuums have advanced immensely. Initial models tended to randomly bump their way around the room, often missing key areas on the floor during their runtime. Since those early days, these cons have turned into pros with the innovative use of sensors and motor controllers in combination with dedicated open-source software and drivers. Here is a look at some of the different sensors used in today’s robot vacuums for improved navigation and cleaning. Read More 9. How AI chipset bans could impact Chinese robotics companies NVIDIA  and  AMD said that the United States government has ordered them to halt exports of certain A

6 reasons robotics startups must attend RoboBusiness

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The RoboBusiness Conference & Expo , which runs Oct. 19-20 in Santa Clara, doesn’t just cater to established robotics companies. This industry event features a plethora of startups looking to make their mark on the world. RoboBusiness provides a variety of opportunities for robotics startups to learn, network, and continue to scale their business. Here are 6 reasons why startup robotics companies must attend this event. Startup Bootcamp RoboBusiness partnered with MassRobotics on a startup bootcamp that covers the major stages in a startup’s formation. Topics include legal formation, stock options and patents, dilutive and non-dilutive investments, the path to manufacturing, best practices in accounting, and bringing on marketing, sales and HR experts, as well as fundraising and exits. Learn more about the boot camp by viewing the RoboBusiness agenda . Connect with investors Leading robotics industry investors will be at RoboBusiness to discuss the current state of robotics

Dexterity partners with Sumitomo to deploy 1,500 robots in Japan

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A Dexterity robot performing parcel handing operations. | Source: Dexterity Dexterity partnered with Sumitomo, a Japan-based multinational trading and business investment company, to bring more robots to Japanese warehouses. The companies plan to deploy 1,500 intelligent material handling robots in Japan by 2026. The companies plan to deploy Dexterity’s parcel singulation and induction solutions with its first Japanese customer by Q1 of 2023. Sumitomo will also work with Dexterity to open a demo facility in Japan in October 2022. Sumitomo signed a distributorship agreement in Japan with Dexterity to push the Robots as a Service (RaaS) business in Japanese warehouses. The company invested in Dexterity’s 2020 funding round through its U.S.-based corporate venture capital arm Presidio Ventures. Dexterity’s full-stack robotic platform can help robotic industrial arms to automate the toughest jobs in the warehouse. The Software as a Service (SaaS)-based platform gives robots machine

Sarcos CEO Kiva Allgood to keynote Field Robotics Engineering Forum

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Kiva Allgood, CEO of Sarcos , will kick off the second day of the 2022 Field Robotics Engineering Forum by discussing how dexterous robots can be used to assist workers in challenging, unstructured environments. Sarcos acquired Pittsburgh-based RE2 Robotics in March 2022 for $100M. RE2 has a product line of remotely teleoperated robotics solutions, including underwater ROVs and terrestrial, dual-arm robotics solutions. Combined with the “classic” Sarcos exoskeletons, the combined company has a unique portfolio of field robotics solutions. I visited the Sarcos Salt City headquarters in May 2022 for a media briefing event . At the event, I had the opportunity to operate the RE2 teleoperated arm and get a feel for how the Sarcos exoskeleton functions. Sarcos is in the early prototype phase of development for its next generation of exoskeletons. A lighter weight and more functional version of their existing Guardian XO, it also promises to be able to walk autonomously, without a huma

CIONIC brings in $12.5M for bionic clothing

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The Cionic Neural Sleeve aims to help people living with multiple sclerosis, stroke, cerebral palsy and other mobility impairments. | Source: CIONIC CIONIC , a bionic clothing company, brought in $12.5 million in Series A funding, bringing the company’s total funding to date to $23 million. The company’s first product, the Cionic Neural Sleeve, recently received FDA clearance.  The Cionic Neural Sleeve combines movement analysis and augmentation into a wearable device with a sleek and comfortable design that can be operated by a smartphone. The sleeve analyzes, predicts and augments a person’s movements, helping to reduce pain and increase mobility in users.  It works by first using a dense array of sensors to measure how the user’s body is positioned and how their individual muscles fire during movements. It then predicts intended movements by measuring electrical signals from the brain, and algorithms analyze this data in real-time to decide optimal muscle activation patterns. T